REGISTER TODAY TO ...

  • Create, save and share trips
  • Receive our monthly e - newsletter
  • Share your thoughts on our blog posts
  • Shop with ease at our online store
  • Create and share product wish lists
  • View and track order history
  • Rate our photos and videos

Visitors Guide

Request our 2017 Official Alton Visitors Guide and start planning your trip today!

2017 Official Alton Visitors Guide
Social Lounge

Confederate Prison

William Street & Broadway Street
Alton, IL 62002
Get Directions

P: (800) 258-6645
P: (800) 258-6645
View Website
3.5 of 5 bubbles
42 Reviews
Confederate Prison

In just three years, more than 11,700 Confederate prisoners passed through the gates of the Alton Prison and were held captive with its walls. The Alton Prison, opened in 1833 and closed in 1860, was the first Illinois State Penitentiary. In December of 1861, after inspecting the facilities, Major General Henry Halleck, Commander of the Department of the Missouri, prepared to have the prison re-opened as a the Alton Federal Military Prison.

Click here to listen to a story about the old Confederate Prison.

On Feb. 9, 1862, the first prisoners arrived at the prison. Inmates of the prison included Confederate soldiers, citizens imprisoned for treason acts, and bushwackers or guerillas imprisoned for acts against the government. Much of the time, the prison was overcrowded, prisoners were malnourished and had inadequate clothing.  

Under these dilapidated conditions, prisoners were exposed to influenza, dysentery and small pox. The small pox epidemic grew in numbers, and the official military death toll listed 1,354 deceased. A monument dedicated to those who perished can be found at their burial site in the Confederate Cemetery.

After the war, the prison was privately purchased and building blocks were removed.  The remaining small portion of the wall was restored in 1973 and may be visited today.


TripAdvisor
Traveler Reviews brought to you by
TripAdvisor
Alton Prison
214 William St, Alton, IL 62002-6146
3.5 of 5 bubbles
42 Reviews
TripAdvisor Traveler Rating
Excellent
8
Very Good
12
Average
18
Poor
3
Terrible
1
true
Recent Reviews
rhull871
Trip type:
Couples
Just a neat historic place
Jul 14, 2019
A confederate history must, There isn't much there any longer, but the history behind the place and stories attached to it, makes a great place to stop. more »
Jeramie
Southern Illinois
Trip type:
Family
Historical Significance
Jun 10, 2019
Like other reviewers mentioned, this is a bit difficult to locate and not much of the ruins are left. However, if you like American and/or Civil War history you need... more »
DuneBug2
Illinois
Trip type:
Family
Neat Little Stop
Aug 4, 2018
Not too much here but still a neat little stop to view the ruins that are left. Several detailed informative boards give some history of the Prison and its' role... more »
Dawn B
Trip type:
Couples
Very informative.
Aug 4, 2018
Little difficult to find if you don't know where your going, as there isn't much of it left. One small wall that isn't even in it's original location. It was... more »
mkitchens
Oxford, Mississippi
Trip type:
Couples
Only a portion of wall left standing
Jun 20, 2018
There are a couple of kiosks with information, too, but that's about it. From the reviews I read, it is what I expected to see, but I still had to... more »
1-5 of 42 Reviews

These reviews are the subjective opinions of individual travelers and not of TripAdvisor LLC nor of its partners.

© 2019 TripAdvisor LLC
Confederate Prison

In just three years, more than 11,700 Confederate prisoners passed through the gates of the Alton Prison and were held captive with its walls. The Alton Prison, opened in 1833 and closed in 1860, was the first Illinois State Penitentiary. In December of 1861, after inspecting the facilities, Major General Henry Halleck, Commander of the Department of the Missouri, prepared to have the prison re-opened as a the Alton Federal Military Prison.

Click here to listen to a story about the old Confederate Prison.

On Feb. 9, 1862, the first prisoners arrived at the prison. Inmates of the prison included Confederate soldiers, citizens imprisoned for treason acts, and bushwackers or guerillas imprisoned for acts against the government. Much of the time, the prison was overcrowded, prisoners were malnourished and had inadequate clothing.  

Under these dilapidated conditions, prisoners were exposed to influenza, dysentery and small pox. The small pox epidemic grew in numbers, and the official military death toll listed 1,354 deceased. A monument dedicated to those who perished can be found at their burial site in the Confederate Cemetery.

After the war, the prison was privately purchased and building blocks were removed.  The remaining small portion of the wall was restored in 1973 and may be visited today.


Trending

°

SIGN IN




(8 to 12 characters)

RESET PASSWORD

SIGN UP



(8 to 12 characters)
(8 to 12 characters)